Scene Detail

"I don't blame my congregation. It's not easy to understand why I did what I did. What I had to do."

From: But Not For Love
Gender Age Character Name
Female 40s DUCHESS
 
Setup:
Eleanor and Ephram, sister and brother, are both getting married on the same day. And they're each getting married to a man. With protesters, policemen and a TV news crew outside the church, inside the couples are split over what their day and their ceremony should mean, to themselves or anyone else.

Patrick, Ephram's groom, agrees with Eleanor that they all need to make a statement by getting married. But Roland, Eleanor's groom, and Ephram both just want a simple ceremony and a quiet day.

The Duchess, the female minister who will be performing the ceremony, makes her first appearance with this speech.

Her secret, referred to here and revealed later, is that she began life as a man, before her gender reassignment surgery.

(Facing the truth of her identity and the meaning of this day with the policeman Duke can be found in a scene under the tag quote -

"When did the world become so complicated?")

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Monologue

copyright 2006 by Matthew A. Everett


The DUCHESS - a woman in her late 40s/early 50s - standing alone, donning a minister's white ceremonial robes as she speaks.

She might be speaking to the audience, but it's just as likely she's talking to God.


DUCHESS

I don't miss my old life.
Not all of it.
Parts of it.
I miss my church.
Not the building.
The community.
The day to day.
The weekly gathering together.
That mystic, sweet communion.
The births.
The sickness.
The joy.
The funerals.
The arguments.
The food.
I felt like I had a family again.
Mostly I miss the weddings.
Nothing tests a person like a wedding.
The best ones are happy days, to be sure. But it is so easy to get lost.
Who you choose to invite, who you ask to witness your commitment.
And who you don't.
Who stands with you.
And who can't, who won't.
It's a brave and foolish thing to promise to love one other person for the rest of your life in front of God and witnesses, both of whom will hold you to it, and will be more than happy to remind you if you don't.
But it's one of the nicest reckless things you can do to and with another person.
If you find someone who inspires that kind of daring in you - well, then you're extremely fortunate.
Being asked to preside over such an act, those are the times I feel most fortunate of all.
Calling the gown out of retirement and me in it - out of the closet, if you'll pardon the expression.

The DUCHESS finishes by placing a rainbow-colored stole around her neck.


DUCHESS (cont'd)

I don't blame my congregation. It's not easy to understand why I did what I did. What I had to do.
There are days even I don't fully understand it.
But I'm better off.
I like to think the world is better off, too.

She prepares to go.


DUCHESS (cont'd)

I miss the weddings.
And the possibility of my own.
When they find out.
And sooner or later, they all find out.
They have to.




copyright 2006 by Matthew A. Everett

© Matthew A Everett
matthewaeverett.com